Gibbon,
Siamang, Orangutan, Gorilla, Chimpanzee, Bonobo,
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1999-2005 William H. Calvin. 

William H. Calvin 
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The "Lesser Apes" of Southeast Asia
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 SIAMANG     Siamangs are the size of a large monkey, twice the size of gibbons.

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Eloise with 5 month old Hitam Lucu
 


Sutera, 13, female siamang at Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo.

Simon, male siamang at Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo.

Sutera, 13, female siamang at Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo.

 

SimonSt

udents and teachers are welcome to borrow these low-resolution photos for non-commercial uses.  There is no need to ask permission, just  "Photo credit WilliamCalvin.com."   Right-click on an image and save it to disk.   Except as noted, all photographs are by William H. Calvin.

Sutera and Simon, howling duet

 


 

 

Hitam Lucu, 15-month-old siamang at San Diego Zoo.

Hitam Lucu, 15-month-old siamang, and Satu, adult male orangutan

Hitam Lucu, 15-month-old siamang, and Satu, adult male orangutan

Hitam Lucu, 15-month-old siamang, and Satu, adult male orangutan

 

 

 


Gibbon, Siamang, Orangutan, Gorilla, Chimpanzee, Bonobo,
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GIBBON (various subspecies)    ♂   Gibbons are the size of a small monkey.




   


 

   


 

San Diego Wild Animal Park gibbon fact sheet                                   

 

Gibbon, Siamang, Orangutan, Gorilla, Chimpanzee, Bonobo.
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Most ape portraits that you see are skewed to the grotesque or scary (note, however, that whenever all the teeth are showing, the ape was likely yawning). 

The collection here tries to show a wide range of ape facial expressions and body postures.

 

Most of the ape portraits were taken at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Wild Animal Park, the Great Ape Trust of Iowa, Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo, and the Milwaukee Zoo. The chimps are at Burger's Zoo in Arnhem, Netherlands.  Several monkey portraits are from the Denver Zoo.

APES are not MONKEYS
Many people do not know the difference between a monkey and an ape. Apes are a branch of the Old World Monkeys that lost their tail, evolved very versatile shoulder joints, and doubled brain size.  Apes are "super monkeys" and humans are "super apes," having developed upright posture in the last 6 million years and then tripled brain size over that of the great apes starting about 2.5 million years ago.

The patas monkey is an Old World Monkey,
as is the colorful mandrill (right) and the
red-faced Japanese macaque  (grooming pair, right).

The default expression of each of these three monkey species is "expressive" in the manner of a painting, but it is not versatile in the manner of the great apes.

Even in the lesser apes, one seldom sees the postures and facial expressions, so reminiscent  of humans, that are frequent in the great apes (gorillas, orangutans, chimpanzees, and bonobos).

There used to be many species of apes, but most are now extinct. The remaining apes live quite close to the equator, in either Africa or southeast Asia and its offshore islands.  All are rapidly disappearing in the wild, endangered by timber cutting and hunting.  Viral disease has been quickly reducing ape populations in Central Africa.

Our closest relatives are the chimps and bonobos, with whom we shared a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.  (Gorilla 8, orangutan 12, lesser apes 18.)

Recent books by the photographer:


A Brief History
of the Mind
2004

A Brain for All Seasons
2002

Lingua ex Machina
2000

William H. Calvin is a neurobiologist at the University of Washington in Seattle who wanders regularly into anthropology, evolution, and climate change.  He won the Phi Beta Kappa 2002 Book Award for contributions to literature by a scientist.

 

 

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Books by
William H. Calvin

 

 

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Conversations with
Neil's Brain
1994

 

 

 

 



 

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William H. Calvin is a neurobiologist at the University of Washington in Seattle who wanders regularly into anthropology, evolution, and climate change.  He is the author of A Brain for All Seasons, winner of the Phi Beta Kappa 2002 Book Award for contributions to literature by scientists.

copyright 2005 by William H. Calvin

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